Industrial trans fatty acids: great danger for the world population

Industrial trans fatty acids: great danger for the world population
Industrial trans fatty acids: great danger for the world population

Trans fatty acids, these toxic products that kill and cause serious diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, generate huge costs for health systems.

The World Health Organization (WHO) admits that it cannot achieve its goal of eliminating industrial trans fatty acids by 2023, products used in many consumer foods. The organization clarified in a press release that this objective remains “unattainable at the present time”. In 2018, the organization published a guide, titled “Replace”, which breaks down, step by step, the measures to be taken to eliminate industrially produced trans fatty acids, everywhere in the world.

This great problem that disrupts global health, resulting in deaths every year, is a real danger to human life. Trans fatty acids, these toxic products that kill and cause serious diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, generate huge costs for health systems.

Today, only 43% of the world’s population benefits from protective measures against these products, which the WHO estimates cause heart disease responsible for 500,000 deaths a year. Industrial trans fatty acids are found in solidified vegetable fats, such as margarine and clarified butter (ghee), and are also found in snack foods, baked foods, and fried foods. Manufacturers appeal to these products because they have a longer shelf life and are less expensive than other greases.

Currently, 9 of the 16 countries with the highest estimated proportion of coronary heart disease deaths caused by trans fat intake have failed to meet the recommendations dictated by the WHO. These are Australia, Azerbaijan, Bhutan, Ecuador, Egypt, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan and South Korea.

In addition, the WHO pointed out that Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, would be the first State to put in place a policy of good practices for the elimination of trans fats, while no low-income country does. still adopted.

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